[ENG] Recitations and Reconsiderations [11/15] Recitations

The Christian practice of liturgical recitation of sacred texts (also known in other religions, and notably in the context of the Jewish synagogue, from which the Christian tradition most probably originated) has a long and interesting history, that has been described elsewhere.

A text was chanted to simple formulae based on a reciting tone with musical inflections reflecting grammatical structure, and punctuation signs becoming indicators for the performance. According to the function of the text or the solemnity of the occasion, recited texts were troped (most frequently the Epistle, see Figure 1) or more elaborate recitation styles were used, for example in Lamentations, genealogies, or Passion recitations. Singers’ creativity flourished, up to the point that the Council of Grado (1296) felt the need to restrict the use of ornate melodies.

Now that is a point in history to which a performer can relate: recitational practice was rich, and testimony of many different forms of this practice in manuscripts provides the creative potential for splendid recitations, amounting to anything between a sober and a complex plainchant performance.

Hendrik Vanden Abeele

Barcelona, Biblioteca Catalunya M. 911 f38v, Psallentes.com
Cantorale from Gerona (Barcelona, Biblioteca Catalunya M. 911 f38v-39) with a fragment of a troped Epistle (letter from St Paul to Timothy). The tropes are distinguishable as more ornate than the more or less recto tono passages from St Paul’s letter.

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